The gap in the forestry market is being filled

As the machines for large-scale forestry become ever larger, a gap in the market has been created for smaller professional machines. That’s now being filled by other machinery manufacturers.

One of them is Terri, best known for its small tracked forest machines. But for the past couple of years, the company has also been making two larger machines – a forwarder and a harvester – although they are still small in comparison with other professional machines.

“The landowners have become aware of the advantages of slightly smaller machines,” explains sales agent Pontus Walldén, who is also a woodlot owner himself.

The Terri 34C harvester is 2.05 metres wide, compared with 2.8 to 3.1 metres for a full-size harvester.

“A narrower and smaller machine can leave more trees standing between the first and second thinnings, which gives a more storm-resistant stand plus extra trees in reserve in case they’re needed,” he says.

Another advantage of smaller machines is their lower ground pressure and consequently less ground damage, which is what private forest owners want. Because in Sweden such individuals jointly own half the country’s forest land, there is a considerable market for slightly smaller professional-quality machines, a trend that has been confirmed at SkogsElmia 2019.

Published
6/7/2019
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“Smaller machines leave more trees behind from the thinnings, which gives more storm-resistant stands,” is Pontus Walldén’s explanation of the strong demand for the Terri 34C harvester.
“Smaller machines leave more trees behind from the thinnings, which gives more storm-resistant stands,” is Pontus Walldén’s explanation of the strong demand for the Terri 34C harvester.